5 Steps to Digitizing the Writing Workshop

"If you can write what people will read by choice," shares Vicki Spandel, author of Six Traits Writing, "the world is your's" (Source: http://bit.ly/bRwHIs). Over400 million bloggers experience the truth of this statement daily. If their writing fails to engage, no one reads their work. Yet other bloggers experience that the world is their's every time they publish a piece online. As human beings writing about our passions, many of us have a deep desire to be heard and recognized...in the past, the experience required the rigamarole of having an editor read your work. Now, like everything else, the Internet enables us to skip the intermediaries and go straight to the audience. Of course, if what you write doesn't sparkle in the eye of your readers, you will lack for readers.

Expecting students to write in our classrooms for hit-or-miss praise is criminal. Their nimble fingers can text an entire piece of writing via their mobile device to a relevant audience online at the same time they publish to a worldwide network. For them, the pay is in the joy of publication, in the act of making their work known, and of partaking of the work of others.

Gretchen Bernabei, speaking to a teacher audience participating at a 2010 Summer Writing Academy, shares the following observation:
  • If students leave the writing workshop feeling famous, then I have done my job right. Sharing your writing, being enlarged by others' writing is what makes you feel famous.
Source: Gretchen Bernabei, 2010 Summer Writing Academy, San Antonio ISD, San Antonio, Texas
As a writing workshop facilitator, you have a multitude of online spaces where students can publish their writing for the world to see. Those include school district or teacher-managed blogs, wikis, Moodle-based virtual classrooms (find out more about Moodle), external web sites such as Kidpub.com and many others. Check Sidebar 1: Student Publishing Online for a partial listing.

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In 2008, my daughter, Rosalie (pen name: Solana), published her writing online via Kidpub.com. Only 14 years old at the time, she had access to a multitude of publishing choices. She did not publish in print until 2010 via Lulu.com, one of many web sites that allow you to publish your own book. She became famous in her small circle of friends and family, having shared her work online and, later, in print. At no time did she share her work with a teacher, and had published 18 chapters of her writing (a total of 50 pages) online before her parents found out.

Another pair of children--home-schooled in a log cabin in Tennessee using an old laptop computer with MS Paint and Moviemaker--converted the first 3 chapters into videos shared on YouTube.com. The parents of the children had no idea their children had done this until after the first two videos had been created.

While publishing student writing online fundamentally hooks students as writers, as teachers, we can take advantage of available tools to make our jobs easier. Just as our students have new digital tools, so do we as their teachers.

This article is about 5 steps you can take, as a writing teacher, to digitize your writing workshop. There are many more, though, so "stay tuned" for future articles!

  1. Embrace open web tools
  2. Focus on the Facilitator
  3. Create an Online Writing Space
  4. Facilitate Online Conversations about Student Writing
  5. Offer feedback in audio or video, rather than written, format

Please recall that digital citizenship--including cybersafety--principles must be kept in mind. Also be sure to adhere to your school district's responsible/acceptable use policy.

#1 - EMBRACE OPEN WEB TOOLS
"My son has dysgraphia and dyslexia," pointed out a teacher in a summer writing academy, "His school never met his needs, putting him on skill-n-drill software." In contrast, another mother and teacher shared, "My child learned to use a computer in third grade and has used it since then...he's fifteen years old now." The red-haired teacher pauses for a moment. "He's now out of Special Education and in Gifted Talented Program.

"Computer software now allows young children to write and illustrate their own stories before their fine motor skills are developed enough to allow them to do so by hand" (Source: National School Boards Association, http://bit.ly/9Cwbz9). Student writers can publish their work, not only in print, but in a variety of media. Text, audio, and images combine when students use blogs, wikis, podcasts and digital storytelling. Students may find it easier to collaborate on a piece of writing when using collaborative word processors. Neither teachers or students can afford to ignore freely available technologies. These digital tools on the "open web" allow you to create a variety of media, much of which begin with text. Some of my favorites include the ones listed online at http://bit.ly/digitizethismedia.
Within this context of writers with its focus on the recursive, writing process, a wide variety of technology tools are available. Note that writing can find expression in a variety of media formats, as well as be developed singly or in collaboration with others. Take advantage of over 20 digital tools for students (Sidebar #2 - Digital Tools for Students). Learning to use open web tools--like social bookmarking site Diigo.com which allows students to annotate web sites, make notes and keeps it all in one location--eliminate the "Oh, I left my writing journal at home/work and now I'm stuck." You can easily transition from notes and highlights kept in Diigo.com social bookmarking tool to a written piece that appropriately cites content. Check Sidebar #3 for Electronic Citation Resources.
#2 - FOCUS ON THE FACILITATOROur job as writing workshop facilitators can be pretty harrowing. Even a paper-centric writing workshop involves juggling colored sheets to create books, setting up writing centers, helping students deal with the daily struggle of journals and journal responses, and, crafting mini-lessons that engage and endure. The focus is always on student writing. As workshop facilitator, you can work to find the answer to the question, "How can technologies we now have make the HOW of writing workshop easier for the teacher?"
One possibility is to reflect on the teacher's role in the writing workshop, and the technology available to organize the writing workshop. The work Diana Benner and I focused on centered around writing workshop components, including the following: 1) The Mini-Lesson; 2) The Status of the Class; 3) Write/Confer; and 4) Group Share. There are many more components and activities, but these present a starting point. Consider taking just one of these--such as the mini-lesson--and building an online writing space that allows you to share and archive your mini-lessons. Here are some simple ways you can use available free technology online:
  1. Create a Self-Editing checklist that is actually a GoogleForm or the Questionnaire Module in Moodle so you can quickly see class progress in graphs. Students complete this information via a web-based form that allows you to quantitatively track progress in class.
  2. Create a bank of online mini-lessons that students can watch and listen to again and again in an archive. Build that in your GoogleSites Wiki or Moodle.
  3. Facilitate sharing using recording tools in a discussion forum or Sites wiki. When doing the Group Share during a Writing Workshop, you can either play the students' presentation of the audio (which they recorded when they were ready) or record the feedback students get so that it can be added to the written piece/recording shared. That way, students can come back and reflect on the advice provided by their peers.

While some of the ideas above are elaborated in this article, consider how technology, rather than complicating your life, can make it easier for you and your students over the long run of a writing workshop, eliminating the constant paper chase.
#3 - CREATE AN ONLINE WRITING SPACEOften, writing folders serve as the central repository in a classroom in the throes of a writing workshop. As a writing workshop facilitator, my efforts involved storage of students' writing folders in crates and/or file cabinet, depending on what was available. All writing resided on pieces of paper. Specific areas of writing workshop can be moved online. If your students are publishing online--whether via a blog, wiki, collaborative word processor, Moodle forum--then an online space to bring all the artifacts together is critical. A staple of the mini-lesson includes the mini-lesson.
"In the mini-lesson," my mentor teacher explained to me, "someone--usually the teacher, but it can be a student or a guest speaker--introduces a new concept to writers. The mini-lesson, lasting 10-20 minutes, can also be focused on meeting the needs identified in students' writing. The mini-lesson facilitator models the approach introduced, writing alongside the students." Using a Moodle or wiki, you can create a reference point that can house your mini-lesson content, including audio and/or video recordings. Moodle allows you to group content around topics, or week of study.

Several solutions are available to the problem of creating an online writing space, such as:

Once you know where you are going to put your writing workshop content--where you can share anything, everything you and your students will need for writing workshop--decide what format you will put that information online in. Here are three types of tools--with specific suggestions--that you can use:
  1. Create Digital Content viewable by Students using Digital Storytelling Tools
    • MS Photostory (Windows only) - Enables teacher to create an enhanced podcast--pictures and sound--about the MiniLesson content.
    • ShowBeyond.com - Enables teachers to create an enhanced podcast about the MiniLesson content.
    • VoiceThread.com - Enables teachers to create an enhanced podcast about the MiniLesson content, but also allow students to contribute audio, text, or video content as comments. This enables many to many interactions.
  2. Create an electronic slideshow using Online Presentation Tools - Teachers can create presentations and make them easily accessible online, embedding the code of the presentation. This relieves students from the requirement of having MS Office installed on their computers.
    • GoogleDocs Presentation Tool - Enables teachers to create a slideshow that students can participate in chat, as well as contribute slides to.
    • ZohoShow.com - Enables easy uploading of your Powerpoint presentation.
  3. Share your MS Office/OpenOffice created documents as PDFs.
    • Scribd.com - Allows you to print up a long document as a PDF and place it online for easy viewing on-screen. No downloading (getting) of large Word documents. Instead, you simply paste "embed code" that allows you to directly include content on a web page you have created. Students simply view the content online.
  4. Add audio introductions to writing workshop mini-lessons:
    1. Audioboo.com - This allows you to use your mobile phone to record and share audio content. You call it in and the content appears magically online and accessible for students to access.
    2. Drop.io - This is another phenomenal, easy to use tool that you can use with your students to collect feedback on a piece of writing (audio or text) in one place. Setup is free.

#4 - FACILITATE ONLINE CONVERSATIONS ABOUT THE WRITING
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"Eddie, if you write about parts of yourself, I bet your reader will have some of those parts, too. I guess that's a small answer to the big question you asked." In this excerpt from Louis Borden's book, The Day Eddie met the Author, we read the tale of Eddie, a third grader. Eddie who, when his favorite author visits, finds that he is not able to ask his question of the author. Fortunately, the author sees him and reads the yellow paper where Eddie had written his question. You may intuit the question from the answer the author gave Eddie.

When I first started facilitating writing workshops, one of the best sources of insights for students came from the students themselves. Facilitating large group share provides students a place for them to find out what others think of their ideas. That said, students tend to focus on different aspects of a person's writing. Each of us, while listening to a writer, may find that the writing connects with a part of us.
As wonderful as a writing workshop teacher may be, s/he cannot offer the feedback that ALL students may need. However, online discussion forums through Moodle, attached to wikis, or with blog postings and comments CAN facilitate student to student interaction independent of the teacher. While many fear these kinds of interactions, in online learning, these interactions make or break an online course...or a face to face one. Moodle allows teachers to create a rich, safe environment with ample "brain food" for learners.

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Collaborative word processors can also serve as a way for students in groups to interact with ONE text online. Imagine having a piece that needs editing. Paste the text of that piece into a collaborative word processor, then engage in group "ratiocination." Ratiocination, a term encountered in an article by Joyce Armstrong Carroll, involves using codes that symbolize specific modifications that can be made to a text. Students can learn to decode clues, as Carroll (Source: Acts of Teaching, http://amzn.to/9I0NAs) says, and "figure out words and meanings to solve the mystery of their written drafts."

For example, some common clues include circling all "to be" verbs, making a wavy line under repeated words, etc. Some of this work--with adjustment from the paper to electronic codes for clues--can be done in a collaborative word processor.

In a classroom using a collaborative word processor, assign different groups of students different clues to code and then turning them loose on a writing assignment. The written piece undergoes a virtual transformation online in full view of the students. This modeling of the approach can then be repeated with students' own writing with a peer.

Educator "Mr. Warner" shares that learning conversation about writing can also involve offline work that finds expression online. He writes:

  • "In just over twenty minutes, the Class had gathered nearly 80 different ideas / persuasive phrases for use in our future lessons. These documents were on display on our interactive whiteboard, so we could see what everyone in the class was doing as the lesson progressed. They are also stored online, allowing us to access them during our future lessons."
(Source: Etherpad in the Classroom Blog, http://www.mrwarner.com/2009/03/etherpad-in-the-classroom, Available: April, 2010 now offline).


In addition to posting written texts and commenting, you can also add audio or video.

#5 - OFFER WRITING FEEDBACK IN A VARIETY OF MEDIA FORMATSShelly Blake-Pollock, the teacher and author of the TeachPaperless blog (http://teachpaperless.blogspot.com), encourages his students to publish online. Beyond that step, though, he offers feedback on their writing online as well via screencasts, or video recording of his computer screen. Screencasts, or "JingCrits," that he creates are short, less than 5-minute video clips where he highlights student work on screen and offers feedback (View an example - http://bit.ly/bsgVQQ).

Blake-Pollock sends each student a link to their own feedback. The response, Shelly says, has been positive:
  • So far, the reaction to Jing comments has been overwhelmingly in favor. In fact, both students and parents have been pushing me to produce as many JingCrits as my time allows.
This kind of feedback can connect with auditory learners who may prefer to get their feedback in another format besides cryptic comments on a post-it attached to their piece of writing. The teacher reviews student writing online, offering specific feedback, recording the feedback as a video recording. The teacher reports taking only 5-8 minutes to record feedback that would normally take 20 or more minutes to write out as feedback.

JingCrits get their name from The Jing Project, a free screen-recording tool available at http://jingproject.com that enables you to post videos online. Using screen-recording tools to offer feedback--whether from teacher to student, student to teacher, student to student--can offer tremendous benefits to students. This kind of video/audio feedback contribute to the demise of one writing myth--"it takes longer to grade writing." As Shelly's JingCrit demonstrates, writing workshop facilitators can grade for discrete skills. The focus on the lead of a paper is helpful.

Writing Workshop facilitators may be familiar with the Carroll/Wilson Analystic Scale for Classroom Use. The scale enables teachers to assess quickly and effectively what they have taught their students. Developed collaboratively with students, the scale embodies intelligent writing assessment. Simply, you only get graded on what you were taught. Imagine having students and teacher develop a Carroll/Wilson Analytic Scale for Classroom Use--centered around what has recently been taught in class--then offering video feedback on a piece of writing using that scale. The video of the Analytic Scale, shared online with students, serves as a perpetual "model" of how to provide feedback.

Shelly has found a quick way to offer feedback his student writers need using screencasting. Some free web-based services that do not require you to install anything on your computer include ScreenToaster.com, ScreenCastle.com, and/or Screencast-o-matic.com. Online tutorials are available for each, but you should be able to get going fairly quickly with 15 minutes of exploration.

If video is not for you, you can also take advantage of digital audio tools. A variety of tools are useful in this category. From inexpensive digital audio recorders, a USB microphone connected to a computer running Audacity audio recording/editing program (free) to online free web-based recording sites like Vocaroo.com and Drop.io, you and your students can easily record audio.

    • Digital Audio Recorder - Teacher can record the mini-lesson and post it on class web site (e.g. blog, wiki). This is an ideal tool for field trips or "on the go" recordings where a mobile phone is not desirable.
    • Vocaroo.com - Students can record a reading of their written piece then email it to the teacher or to other students.
    • Drop.io - This web site allows easy recording of audio, whether by sending a locally recorded audio file on a computer, emailed from a mobile device, or "phoned in."
    • AudioBoo.com - This web site allows phone recording of content and publishing online.

These are only some of the technology tools available. Be judicious in which tools you decide to infuse into the writing workshop.

CONCLUSION
Remember that the technologies you can use to digitize your writing workshop are easily adaptable to multiple uses. If you find you want to scaffold student writing--or your own teaching of writing--by using tools differently, then do so. Learning to use new technologies to transform how we approach writing workshop, while a matter of choice for teachers, is a life-skills requirement for our children.

Make the right choice, share back and let me know what you’ve done.



SideBar 1 - Students Publishing Online

  1. Amphitheater List - http://bit.ly/IOq1F - features over 20 web sites where student work can be published online.
  2. Education World article on Encourage Student Writing - http://bit.ly/1IjwJx - Offers additional suggestions.

SideBar 2 - Digital Tools for Students

|| Stage of the Writing Process
Technology Tools Available
Pre-Writing
  1. Storyboarding Documents
  2. Storyboarding Websites
  3. Concept Mapping
  4. Playing with Words
Writing
  1. Digital Storytelling Software
  2. Digital Storytelling Websites
  3. Digital Posters
  4. Comic Strips
  5. Podcasting
    1. AudioBoo
    2. Aviary.com/Tools
    3. Drop.io
Revision
  1. Word Processing
    • Microsoft Word
    • OpenOffice
  2. Collaborative Word Processing
Editing
  1. Word Processing
    • Microsoft Word
    • OpenOffice
  2. Collaborative Word Processing
    • Google Docs
    • iEtherpad.com
    • PrimaryPad.com
Publishing
  1. Digital Storytelling Software
  2. Digital Storytelling Websites



Sidebar #3 - Electronic Citation Resources

· Bibme: This resource creates citations and pulls reference content.
· EasyBib: Bibliography and citation maker--featuring GoogleDocs integration--for books, newspapers, web sites and more.
· Son of Citation Maker: David Warlick’s MLA, APA, Chicago, and Turabian citation guide.
· OttoBib: Enter the ISBN number of a book and it will prepare the citation for you.




WRITING PROCESS STAGE AND TOOLS
Stage
Tools and Examples
Prewriting
  1. Storyboarding Documents
  2. Storyboarding Websites
  3. Concept Mapping

http://psi21.pbworks.com/MindMeister
Writing
  1. Digital Storytelling Software
  2. Digital Storytelling Websites
Revision
  1. Word Processing
    • Microsoft Word
  2. Collaborative Word Processing
  3. Scripting Websites
Editing
  1. Word Processing
    • Microsoft Word
  2. Collaborative Word Processing
    • Google Docs
  3. Scripting Websites
Publishing
  1. Digital Storytelling Software
  2. Digital Storytelling Websites



Writing with Digital Storytelling - Lesson Plan

Grade Focus: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Subject: Language Arts and Cross-Curricular

Recommended Time to Completion: Two to three class periods
INTRODUCTION

Students will work in teams of four to write a collaborative story. Each student will choose a photo or visual image for their story prompt and begin to write/compose their own story based upon this photo. Then, students will switch computers to add to a teammate’s story. Students will continue to rotate computers until the story is completed, contributing to every teammate’s story at once. Students will finish their own stories and add additional digital images once the story is completed. The students will use Microsoft PhotoStory 3 to create their digital story.
PREREQUISITE EXPERIENCE:

Students should have a general understanding of how to use a computer. They will also need to have good keyboarding skills and knowledge of how to use a digital storytelling program. An array of digital images will be added to the final story.
TEACHER PREP TIME: 1 hour

This activity works best when each student has his/her own computer. Using laptops offers flexibility. More information about Digital Storytelling can be found here: __http://www.storycenter.org/__

PROJECT:
Students will collaboratively develop and write a story using the free Microsoft Photostory 3 software. They will add and edit images, insert text, narration, music and transitions.
ASSESSMENT / GRADING:
Using a rubric, the stories will be evaluated on their storyline development and use of software for editing and adding images.


TIME MANAGEMENT TIP:Teams of four will work together to develop the story. You may choose to “time” each writing session and run the session like “musical chairs.” Each person will add to the story in a limited time.

MATERIALS:
To complete your project you will need a computer that has an Internet connection, digital imaging software, and digital storytelling software.

Before you begin your research you might want to review the Center for Digital Storytelling__http://www.storycenter.org/__

Choose a photo for your story starter.

Photos and pictures can also be found at:

flickr™ __http://www.flickr.com/groups/storystarters/__

Setting Thumbs __http://home.freeuk.net/elloughton13/setting.htm__

Picture Prompts __http://www.storyit.com/Starters/picstart.htm__

Once you’ve found a photo that you like, brainstorm answers to this list of questions:
  • What’s happening right now in this image? What happened 10 minutes before the picture what taken? What might happen next?
  • What do you know about the people in the picture? If there aren’t people there, where might they be?
  • Create a list of adjectives to describe what you’d see, feel, smell, touch, or taste if you were IN the picture.
These resources may help you as you write:

Dictionary __www.dictionary.com__

Thesaurus __www.thesaurus.com__



PROCESS:

1. Begin by forming a team of no more than four people.

2. Practice storytelling with your team. Choose one of the “story starters” below. Ask one person to begin telling a story to the group. This person will continue telling the story until the teacher calls time. Have each group use a storyboard to map out their ideas and script.

3. Then, the story passes to the next person in the group. This person continues the story until the teacher calls time.

4. The story continues to pass until everyone has had a chance to add to the story.

5. The first person finishes the story.

6. Discuss these questions as a team:

  • How did storyline grow as each person added to the story?
  • Why was it important to be good listeners during this activity?
  • How did the final story reflect each person’s interest? Personalities?
  • What were the benefits of telling a story collaboratively?
7. Look for photos. You and your team will choose ONE photo as the basis of the stories that you will be writing. Each person will begin their own story using the same photo for inspiration.

8. Your teacher will determine the length of each “writing round.” You will have at least five minutes to write before the round closes. You will start your own story and write at least a sentence or two. Be sure to save the story. Be careful with your file management. Save the files on a computer’s desktop and in the same place at the end of each writing session.

9. Move to one of your team mate’s computers. Carefully read what your team mate has already written. When the teacher officially starts this “writing round,” begin adding to your team mate’s story. You must pick up the story where your team mate left off. Continue writing until the round is over. Save the work again, adding your initials to the end slide.

10. Continue moving to new stories until you return to your own story. Carefully read to follow the growth of your story. Write your story’s ending.

11. Pair with another classmate to “peer edit” each other’s work.

12. Revise your writing based upon comments from your peer edit. Add images throughout the story to help tell your tale.

13. Add an acknowledgement page that will include your name, the names of your collaborative team, the year, your school, and city.

14. Read your story to the class. You and your classmates may also choose to record your stories as audio and video podcasts to share with other students.


Rubric


Wonderful
Wordsmith

Creative
Composer

Up and Coming
Author

Central Idea

One central idea for each piece. All writing is consistently focused on the topic.
Clear idea but occasional loss of focus.
Unclear central idea. Unfocused writing. May have more than one
central idea or may ramble.

Elaboration

Each piece of writing supports its central idea with many details.
Details are included but do not support the central idea.
Lacks details and support.

Tone and Word Choice

Tone and word choice match the audience.
Tone and/or word choice sometimes match the targeted audience.
Inappropriate tone and word choice for designated audience.

Writing Quality

(spelling, punctuation, sentence structure)
Writing is mostly free of spelling, grammatical, and mechanical errors.
Writing has several spelling, grammatical, and mechanical errors.
Needs editing because of numerous spelling, grammatical and mechanical errors.

Applied understanding of digital storytelling software
Applied understanding clearly evident
Applied understanding somewhat evident
Applied understanding is not evident

Overall Final Product
Image(s) demonstrate technical skills and creativity with purpose
Image(s) demonstrate some technical skills and creativity
Image(s) demonstrate limited technical skills and creativity







WRITING WORKSHOP MATRIX


Exciting new tools are available that can enhance the flow of the Writing Workshop, as conceptualized and described by Nanci Atwell, Donald Graves, and Luci Calkins. This matrix provides a list of possible connections between the purpose of the Writing Workshop components and how various tools can eliminate the paper chase of "old" approaches.

MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
Teacher, student or guests present a short lesson that introduces a new concept or meets the needs of writers in the classroom. These mini lessons are often 10-20 minutes long and involve the lesson presenter participating alongside students in writing.
A quick way to stay in touch with what students are working on in their writing, identify particular conference needs.
An opportunity for participants to write, as well as confer with either the teacher and/or peers.
Students sit in a large circle and read their piece of writing to the group. Listeners can practice the TAG approach:

Tell one thing you liked about the written piece shared;

Ask one question;

Give one suggestion.

Blogs

Tool
MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
Blogger
Teachers can use blogs as an extension to the mini lesson by posting related links and follow up material.
X
Teachers and students can use blogs to offer response in the form of posting, tagging, and commenting.
Teachers can assign writing prompts to students allowing them to respond freely via the blog.
Students can publish and share their writing through a blog.
Edublogger
Teachers can use blogs as an extension to the mini lesson by posting related links and follow up material.
X
Teachers and students can use blogs to offer response in the form of posting, tagging, and commenting.
Teachers and students can use blogs to offer response in the form of posting, tagging, and commenting.
Class Blogmeister
Teachers can use blogs as an extension to the mini lesson by posting related links and follow up material.
X
Teachers and students can use blogs to offer response in the form of posting, tagging, and commenting.
Teachers and students can use blogs to offer response in the form of posting, tagging, and commenting.
ePals
Teachers can use blogs as an extension to the mini lesson by posting related links and follow up material.
X
Teachers and students can use blogs to offer response in the form of posting, tagging, and commenting.
Teachers and students can use blogs to offer response in the form of posting, tagging, and commenting.
X = Not applicable. What uses can you think of for Blogs in Class Status?

Digital Audio Recording
A variety of tools are useful in this category. From inexpensive digital audio recorders, a USB microphone connected to a computer running Audacity audio recording/editing program (free) to online free web-based recording sites like Vocaroo.com and Drop.io, you and your students can easily record audio.

Tool
MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
USB Microphone with Audacity software installed
Teacher can record mini-lesson and post it on class web site (e.g. blog, wiki).
X
Teacher can record the mini-conferences with students to document their thinking process prior to expression on paper.
Record audio of written piece to accompany it. Encourage a small group of students to use TAG approach.
Vocaroo.com
Students can--later--attach their oral reading of their written piece.
X
X
Students can record peer podcasts via mobile phone, whether at school or not.
Drop.io
Students can--later--attach their oral reading of their written piece.
X
X
Students can record peer podcasts via mobile phone, whether at school or not.
X = Not applicable. What uses can you think of for digital audio recording in Class Status?


Digital Storytelling Tools
Some digital storytelling tools that are great to use include MS PhotoStory, as well as web-based tools such as VoiceThread.com, and ShowBeyond.com.


Tool
MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
MS Photostory(free download)
Enables teacher to create an enhanced podcast--pictures and sound--about the MiniLesson content.
X
Students could create a rich media slideshow or digital story.
X
ShowBeyond.com
Enables teachers to create an enhanced podcast about the MiniLesson content.
X
Students could create a rich media slideshow or digital story.
X
VoiceThread.com
Enables teachers to create an enhanced podcast about the MiniLesson content, but also allow students to contribute audio, text, or video content.
X
Students could create a rich media slideshow or digital story and be able to solicit comments from other students and the World.
X
X = Not applicable. What uses can you think of for digital audio recording in Class Status?



GoogleDocs

Tool
MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
Word Processor
X
X
Students create a self-editing checklist about their written piece.
X
Spreadsheet
X
Teachers create a spreadsheet with student names and then students update their class status.
X
X
Presentation
Enables teachers to create a slideshow that students can participate in chat, as well as contribute slides to.
X
X
X
Forms
X
X
Students contribute to a self-editing checklist
X
X = Not applicable. What uses can you think of for digital audio recording in Class Status?






iEtherpad

Tool
MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
iEtherPad.com
Model collaborative editing or revision as part of the minilesson.
      • X
X
X

X = Not applicable. What uses can you think of for iEtherpad in Write and Confer?




Screen Recording
Tool
MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
Jing Project
Create a video tutorial of the revision process, modelling that process in a word processor. Include audio narration.
X
X
X
ScreenToaster.com
Create a video tutorial of the revision process, modelling that process in a word processor. Include audio narration.
X
X
X

X = Not applicable. What uses can you think of for Screen Recording in Write and Confer?




Wiki Collaboration

Tool
MiniLesson
Class Status
Write and Confer
Group Share
PBworks.com
Enables teacher to create an easy website to present a mini lesson.
X
Revision history shows what text was revised so that teacher can comment on revisions.
Wiki pages have a discussion page where comments can be added.
Students can publish and share their writing through a wiki anthology.
Sites.Google.com
Enables teacher to create an easy website to present a mini lesson.
X
Revision history shows what text was revised so that teacher can comment on revisions.
Wiki pages have a discussion page where comments can be added.
Students can publish and share their writing through a wiki anthology.
Weebly.com
Enables teacher to create an easy website to present a mini lesson.
X
X
Students can publish and share their writing through a wiki anthology.
Wikispaces.com
Enables teacher to create an easwebsite to present a mini lesson.
X
Revision history shows what text was revised so that teacher can comment on revisions.
Wiki pages have a discussion page where comments can be added.
Students can publish and share their writing through a wiki anthology.
X = Not applicable. What uses can you think of for Wiki Collaboration in Class Status?

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